December 3, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with French Foreign Minister Le Drian

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke yesterday with French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian to discuss reports of concerning Russian military activity in and near Ukraine and their continued ironclad commitment to Ukraine’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.  They also discussed joint efforts to address Iran’s nuclear program.

 

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