December 4, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Former Canadian Foreign Minister Garneau

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with former Canadian Foreign Minister Marc Garneau today.  Secretary Blinken congratulated Foreign Minister Garneau on his successful tenure as Foreign Minister and expressed his sincere appreciation for his partnership and ardent support of the U.S.-Canada relationship.  Secretary Blinken noted the former Foreign Minister’s dedication and leadership on bilateral, regional, and global priorities, and the shared successes in developing the Roadmap for a Renewed U.S.-Canada Partnership, achieving the Declaration Against Arbitrary Detention in State-to-State Relations, and strengthening the U.S.-Canada relationship.

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