December 3, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call With Families Of Loved Ones Held Hostage Or Wrongfully Detained Abroad

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with families of Americans held hostage or wrongfully detained abroad.  Secretary Blinken reaffirmed that the United States is committed to seeking the release of their loved ones.  The Secretary stressed the importance the Biden-Harris Administration places on transparency in our communications with families and ensured that their family members are a top priority in our diplomatic engagements with both allies and adversaries.  The Secretary raised Congress’s recent passage of the Robert Levinson Hostage Recovery and Hostage-Taking Accountability Act and stated the Department is committed to its full implementation.

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