January 27, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Ecuadorian President-Elect Lasso

11 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Ecuadorian President-elect Guillermo Lasso today.  Secretary Blinken congratulated President-elect Lasso for his recent election and the Ecuadorian people for conducting free and fair elections in this challenging pandemic environment.  The Secretary and the President-elect discussed strengthening the already vibrant cooperative bilateral relationship between the United States and Ecuador in trade and investment, governance, security, counter-narcotics, human rights, and on regional issues.  Secretary Blinken conveyed the U.S. commitment for continued cooperation to reinvigorate our economies in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Both affirmed working with partners to restore democracy in Venezuela, and Secretary Blinken expressed his deep appreciation for Ecuador hosting more than 430,000 Venezuelan migrants, while reiterating the continued U.S. commitment to support Ecuador in assisting meeting their growing humanitarian needs.

 

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