December 5, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Dutch Foreign Minister Blok

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Dutch Foreign Minister Stef Blok today. Secretary Blinken expressed the United States’ desire to revitalize and strengthen the U.S.-Netherlands relationship. Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Blok agreed to intensify U.S.-Netherlands cooperation on the basis of shared values to manage key global challenges, including those posed by China, Russia, and Iran. The Secretary thanked the Netherlands for hosting the Climate Adaptation Summit and expressed the United States’ commitment to combating climate change. Together they emphasized the importance of bilateral cooperation in ensuring Transatlantic unity and security.

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