December 8, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Canadian Foreign Minister Garneau

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Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The below is attributable to State Department Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Canadian Minister of Foreign Affairs Marc Garneau today to discuss collaboration between the United States and Canada to defeat the COVID-19 pandemic and the Foreign Minister’s trip to the Middle East.  Noting our shared democratic values, they also discussed efforts to promote democracy and security throughout the Western Hemisphere.  Secretary Blinken and Foreign Minister Garneau also reviewed progress towards the goals as outlined in the Roadmap for a Renewed U.S.-Canada Partnership.

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