January 27, 2022

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Cabo Verdean Prime Minister Correia e Silva

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Cabo Verdean Prime Minister José Ulisses Correia e Silva yesterday.  Secretary Blinken congratulated Cabo Verde on its strong and independent democratic institutions and Cabo Verde’s free and fair presidential election on October 17.  The Secretary recognized Cabo Verde’s robust response to COVID-19 and reiterated the United States’ commitment to continuing to share COVID-19 vaccines with our global partners.

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    In U.S GAO News
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