December 4, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Bahraini Foreign Minister al-Zayani

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with the Bahraini Minister of Foreign Affairs, Dr. Abdullatif bin Rashid al-Zayani.  The Secretary thanked the Foreign Minister for Bahrain’s humanitarian support and role in facilitating the safe transit of U.S. citizens and evacuees from Afghanistan.  The Secretary and Foreign Minister also discussed key policy objectives, including joint regional security initiatives throughout the Gulf.

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