December 4, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with Australian Foreign Minister Payne

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke today with Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne to continue our ongoing efforts to ensure a peaceful and prosperous Indo-Pacific following September’s Australia-United States Ministerial (AUSMIN) meetings in Washington.  They discussed the Australia-UK-U.S. (AUKUS) trilateral security partnership and the ways in which we will deepen our engagement with other key allies and partners in our collective efforts to uphold a free and open Indo-Pacific. They also recommitted to our collective work in the region to build back better from COVID-19.

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