December 9, 2021

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Secretary Blinken’s Call with #AfghanEvac Representatives

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Office of the Spokesperson

The below is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price:

Secretary of State Antony R. Blinken held a virtual meeting yesterday with representatives of #AfghanEvac , an umbrella coalition of more than 100 self-organized groups of veterans, frontline civilians, social workers, attorneys, advocates, non-profits, Congressional staff, and private sector employees.

The call was part of the State Department’s ongoing effort to hear directly from private individuals who are working to support our Afghan allies and partners.  After 20 years of engagement, the State Department recognizes the passionate commitment of many U.S. citizens to their Afghan friends and former colleagues.

Secretary Blinken thanked the organizations represented on the call for their tireless work and dedication and for their partnership with the State Department to help facilitate relocation efforts. The Secretary noted the importance of their voices as leaders to continue to hold government accountable and highlighted the invaluable ongoing, regular coordination between State, the Department of Defense, and #AfghanEvac.

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