January 27, 2022

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken’s Call with Iraqi President Salih

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Office of the Spokesperson

The following is attributable to Spokesperson Ned Price: 

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken spoke with Iraqi President Barham Salih today to express his condemnation of the terrorist attack that targeted Prime Minister Mustafa Kadhimi’s residence.  Secretary Blinken discussed how this attack was also an attack on the sovereignty and stability of the Iraqi state.  Secretary Blinken reiterated that our partnership with the Iraqi government and people is steadfast.  

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