December 4, 2021

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken with Kuwait Television

10 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Kuwait City, Kuwait

The Sheraton Hotel

QUESTION:  So Mr. Secretary, if you could please tell us about your impression about your visit in Kuwait?

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Well, it’s wonderful to be back in Kuwait.  It’s I think an auspicious time to be here.  It’s the 60th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the United States and Kuwait and, of course, the 30th anniversary of the liberation of Kuwait.  So we’re rightly focused on those very important points in history, but mostly we’re looking forward to building on the very strong partnership that we already have.  And Kuwait is a vital partner to the United States, both on a bilateral basis but also working together for stability in the region, for progress, for peace, bringing countries together.  Kuwait’s played a leading role in ending the Gulf rift and bringing countries together.  We’re grateful that it hosts our own forces here.  And we’re working increasingly in different areas.

But I think what’s also interesting from my conversations here today – and it was a privilege to be able to see the amir, the crown prince, as well as my friend and colleague the Foreign Minster al-Sabah, the prime minister, the leader of the parliament – is we’re also focused on so many issues that affect the wellbeing of our citizens, and working more closely together on health security, on food security, on emerging technologies, and as well as the diplomatic work that we do together.  So we had a long agenda.  I think we had very strong conversations about our cooperation.  And I very much look forward to pursuing those in the months ahead.

QUESTION:  Okay.  Thank you.

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