December 3, 2021

News

News Network

Secretary Antony J. Blinken Remarks to Mission Colombia Staff

17 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Bogotá, Colombia

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Hello, Mission Bogotá.  It is great to see all of you, and so good to see folks here together.  Again, to the band, it really does a sound a lot better than the last time I heard it.  (Laughter.)  Amazing.  Thank you.

Phil, Ambassador Goldberg, could have sworn he was here somewhere, thank you so much for your leadership of this mission and our Venezuelan mission that is housed here.  To everyone at Mission Colombia, whether you’re here in person, whether you’re joining us on the screen – great to see all of you as well – thank you so much.  I know from experience how much work goes into one of these visits.  We get to see the fruits of all that labor, and it looks smooth and incredibly well done, without a hitch.  I know that it’s not as simple as that.  I’m incredibly grateful to you for making this visit as productive and successful as it’s been, and I wish I could join you for the wheels-up party that I know will follow soon.  (Laughter.)

A couple things I wanted to share with you while we’re all together.  We were in – as you know, in Ecuador yesterday, came to Colombia.  And one of the things that’s been a thread through both of these visits is the work that we’re trying to do to renew our democracies and to make sure that they’re delivering for our people, for our fellow citizens.  And as the ambassador said, this trip to Colombia is a powerful reminder of that fact and what we’re trying to accomplish.  We did have very productive meetings, thanks to a lot of good work that you put into this, with President Duque, with the Vice President and Foreign Minister Ramírez, plus the ministerial meeting that brought together colleagues from across the hemisphere on migration, trying to deal with the urgent challenge that that poses, but also looking at ways to deal with it in a lasting way.

We had, as well, some very inspiring events with civil society here in Colombia – and I thank the team that worked on putting that together – including young people, environmental leaders.  We were over at, as well, the botanical gardens, making the connection that we have to the work that we’re doing to help us support Colombia as it protects its environmental heritage and as it shows leadership in dealing with climate change.  We’ll do some interviews after this with the media, but in a nutshell that’s kind of what a vibrant democracy is all about.  All of these different groups and constituencies hopefully working together, and a responsive government, an engaged civil society, a free press. 

Not too long ago, that was not the case here in Colombia.  And a stable future, much less a democratic one, was hardly guaranteed.  As recently as a couple decades ago, we watched as the security situation actually got worse, the economy plunged, and cartels thrived.  Colombia looked on the verge of potentially becoming a failed state.  But people demanded peace, democracy delivered – not through violence, but through compromise.  And now, despite many ongoing challenges that many of you are working on, we see the thriving country Colombia has become. 

And I’m very proud of the way this mission over the years, including now, has supported the peace process here.  You’ve helped implement a new counter-narcotics strategy, provided support for economic development in rural parts of the country, helped establish institutions like the disappeared persons search unit, and so much else.  So I hope that you occasionally take a minute to be proud of that record of success, even as you keep working to help push it forward. 

There are so many other things that we are doing together with Colombia.  The ambassador referenced a few of them, but I think if you look at the record of these last couple of days, building on work that you’ve all been doing for a long time, you can see the breadth and depth of the relationship impacting some of the most important issues to us and our people, and to the Colombian people. 

Let me just say a word as well about something we’ve all – you’ve all been living with now for a long time, and that’s COVID-19.  We know, in mission after mission around the world, including at this one, that this has been a difficult journey.  Some of you have lost loved ones.  Some of you have gotten sick or have family members who have gotten sick – I know we lost a locally employed staff member here – and you’ve gone through one of the strictest lockdowns in the world.  But what I see, what I’ve heard, what I know is that through it all you kept going.  You kept moving forward.  You kept getting the job done on behalf of our country and on behalf of our citizens.

In particular, let me just recognize a few people, a few things.  Again, Mr. Ambassador, you, for your leadership during a tumultuous time; the consular team here, continuing to work in-person all throughout COVID, and everyone who helped in the extraordinary effort to medevac sick Americans out of the country; those of you involved in the effort to deliver vaccines here in Colombia, some 6 million of them, which has made a real difference and I think is powerful evidence of the friendship and partnership that we have with Colombia.  And I very much want to thank folks in the Med Unit who worked to make sure that everyone on our team was as safe as possible as quickly as possible.

We actually hit a milestone today more broadly.  The United States has now delivered more than 200 million doses of safe and effective vaccine around the world in more than a hundred countries, including again, the more than 6 million here in Colombia, free of cost, with no political strings attached.  And that’s a story that will continue to be told.  We are committed over the next six to nine months to delivering over a billion vaccines, primarily through COVAX, to countries around the world.

Another thing that we spent some time on, as we’ve already mentioned: migration and the unprecedented challenge that we’re facing in this hemisphere.  You’ve not only been a partner to Colombians, you’ve also been a partner to those who come from beyond Colombia’s borders and who benefitted from the extraordinary generosity from the Colombian people.  And again, I want to recognize here the work of the Venezuela Affairs Unit led by Ambassador Story.  You responded to the humanitarian crisis with humanity, connecting Venezuelan migrants and refugees with host communities across the country.  And because of your work literally thousands of families have been able to remain together, and that’s a powerful human story.

Finally, there’s something I wanted to really put a note of thanks to as well.  Many of you – many of you dropped everything you were doing to help people halfway around the world in Afghanistan during our evacuation and relocation effort.  Colombia volunteered to host 4,000 Afghan refugees and with hardly any notice (inaudible).  Ultimately, we didn’t need (inaudible). 

That’s our plane, so – (laughter).  

Ultimately, this capacity wasn’t needed, but again, it’s amazing how you were able to come together so quickly to give us that possibility if we needed it.  One team can indeed make it happen. 

What strikes me, and I’ve found this in the various missions that I’ve visited over the last nine months around the world – I think it’s a common denominator of this department, the people who make up this department, and all of the many agencies and departments working with us – that you simply persist in your work, in the mission, no matter what the situation is, with integrity and with compassion.

I’ve heard about the care that you’ve shown to each other, plus to your families, and to Colombians across the country during this period.  I’ve heard about the care packages to new staff and the virtual flower arrangements and cooking classes during lockdowns.  And that really gets to something that is important to me and I know important to the ambassador, and that is we come together.  We come together as a team; we come together as a community; we come together as a family to look out for each other.  We have each other’s backs, especially in difficult times.  And I’m so grateful to you for doing just that. 

Whatever your role here at the embassy, whether you’re Foreign Service, whether you’re Civil Service, whether you’re locally employed staff, whether you work for the State Department or one of the many other agencies represented here at Mission Colombia, thank you.  Thank you for all you’re doing to contribute to the partnership between the United States and Colombia.  Thank you for all the work you’re doing that in ways that most of our fellow citizens will probably never really know, but the work that you’re doing in ways big and small to make life just a little bit better for them, a little bit safer, a little bit healthier, a little bit more prosperous, a little bit more full of possibility.  Thank you very much.  (Applause.)

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

News Network

  • May 3, 2021, letter commenting on the International Ethics Standards Board for Accountants’ January 2021 Exposure Draft, “Proposed Revisions to the Definitions of Listed Entity and Public Interest Entity in the Code”
    In U.S GAO News
    This letter provides GAO's response to the exposure draft, Proposed Revisions to the Definitions of Listed Entity and Public Interest Entity in the Code. GAO promulgates generally accepted government auditing standards (GAGAS) in the United States. GAGAS provides a framework for conducting high-quality audits of government awards with competence, integrity, objectivity, and independence. Our comments reflect the importance we place on reinforcing the values promoted in both the International Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants (Code) and GAGAS.
    [Read More…]
  • Special Briefing with Deputy Secretary of State for Management and Resources Brian P. McKeon, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Principal Advisor to the Administrator Mark Feierstein, and Experts On the Administration’s Budget Proposal for the Department of State and USAID for Fiscal Year 2022
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Brian P. McKeon, Deputy [Read More…]
  • Deputy Secretary Sherman’s Participation in U.S.-Switzerland Strategic Partnership Dialogue
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • U.S.-Sudan Signing Ceremony on Bilateral Claims Agreement
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Cale Brown, Deputy [Read More…]
  • Project Monitor and Abatement Company Owner Sentenced to Jail and Fined $399,000 for Conspiring to Violate Asbestos Regulations
    In Crime News
    Kristofer Landell and Stephanie Laskin were sentenced today before U.S. District Judge Thomas J. McAvoy sitting in Binghamton, New York, for conspiring to violate Clean Air Act regulations that control the safe removal, handling and disposal of asbestos.
    [Read More…]
  • Collins Fitzpatrick, Longest-Serving Circuit Executive, Reflects on Career
    In U.S Courts
    On Sept. 28, Collins Fitzpatrick will retire as Circuit Executive of the Seventh Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals, after 50 years of service in the federal Judiciary. In 1976, Fitzpatrick was appointed as the Seventh Circuit’s first executive, five years after Congress created the position. He is by far the longest-serving circuit executive in the federal court system.
    [Read More…]
  • Four California Residents Found Guilty of Scheming to Fraudulently Obtain Millions of Dollars in COVID-19 Relief Programs
    In Crime News
    A federal jury convicted four California residents on June 25, for scheming to submit fraudulent loan applications seeking millions of dollars in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) and Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) COVID-19 relief funds.  
    [Read More…]
  • NASA’s Mars Rover Drivers Need Your Help
    In Space
    Using an online tool to [Read More…]
  • Justice Department Requires Divestiture of Tufts Health Freedom Plan in Order for Harvard Pilgrim and Health Plan Holdings to Proceed With Merger
    In Crime News
    The Department of Justice announced today that it would require Harvard Pilgrim Health Care (Harvard Pilgrim) and Health Plan Holdings (fka Tufts Health Plan) to divest Tufts Health Freedom Plan Inc. (Tufts Freedom), in order to proceed with their merger. Tufts Freedom is Health Plan Holdings’ commercial health insurance business in New Hampshire. The department has approved UnitedHealth Group Inc. (United), as the buyer. Health insurance is an integral part of the American healthcare system, and the proposed settlement will maintain competition for the sale of commercial health insurance to private employers in New Hampshire with fewer than 100 employees.
    [Read More…]
  • Crane company agrees to pay more than $4.5M to resolve lawsuit for non-compliance with Military Specifications
    In Justice News
    Crane Company has agreed [Read More…]
  • Texas woman handed significant sentence for health care fraud scheme
    In Justice News
    A 58-year-old resident [Read More…]
  • Attacks by the Terrorist PKK Organization in the IKR
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Cale Brown, Deputy [Read More…]
  • New York Donut Shop Operators Convicted of Tax Evasion
    In Crime News
    A federal jury in Utica, New York, convicted a New York couple and their son today for conspiring to defraud the United States and for tax evasion.
    [Read More…]
  • United States Sanctions Five Iranian Entities and Watchlists IRGC Cyber Actors for Interfering in Our Elections
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]
  • The Bureau of Overseas Buildings Operations Announces Design-Build Award for the U.S. Consulate General in Lagos
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • المساعدات المُقَدّمة للضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة: في حالة إستئناف التمويل، فإن زيادة الرقابة على إمتثال الجهة الفرعية الحاصلة على المنح لسياسات وإجراءات مكافحة الارهاب الخاصة بالوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية قد يُقلل من المخاطر
    In U.S GAO News
    This is the Arabic language highlights associated with GAO-21-332, which issued on Monday, March 29. لماذا أجرى مكتب مساءلة الحكومة ھذه الدراسة قدمت الحكومة الأمريكية منذ عام 1993 أكثر من 6.3 مليار دولار على شكل مساعدات ثنائية للفلسطينيين في الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة. ووفقا للوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية ووزارة الخارجية الأمريكية، تم إيقاف تمويل صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي (ESF) منذ يناير/ كانون الثاني 2019 بسبب مجموعة من الإجراءات السياساتية والقانونية. إن الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية مسؤولة بشكل رئيسي عن إدارة المساعدات المقدمة من صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي للضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة وضمان الامتثال لسياساته وإجراءاته الخاصة بمكافحة الإرهاب. تتضمن قوانين التخصيص للسنوات المالية 2015-2019 أحكاماً لمكتب مساءلة الحكومة لمراجعة استخدامات أموال صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي الخاصة ببرنامج الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة. كما طُلِبَ من مكتب مساءلة الحكومة مُراجعة كيف يؤثر وقف هذه المساعدات على موارد التوظيف في الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية. يدرس هذا التقرير (1) حالة مساعدات صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي المقدمة من الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية للبرنامج في السنوات المالية 2015-2019، وذلك اعتباراً من 30 سبتمبر/ أيلول 2020؛ (2) الخطوات التي اتخذتها الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية تجاه المشاريع الجارية ومستويات التوظيف عندما توقفت مساعدات صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي؛ (3) مدى امتثال الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية لسياساتها وإجراءاتها الخاصة بمكافحة الإرهاب للسنوات المالية 2015-2019. وقد راجع مكتب مساءلة الحكومة القوانين وسياسات الوكالة وإجراءاتها ووثائقها وبياناتها وقام بتقييم عيّنة قابلة للتعميم من 245 من الجهات الفرعية الحاصلة على المنح للتأكد من الامتثال لسياسات واجراءات الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية الخاصة بمكافحة الإرهاب. النتائج التي توصل إليها مكتب مساءلة الحكومة قدمت الحكومة الأمريكية مساعدات للفلسطينيين في الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة لتعزيز السلام في الشرق الأوسط منذ عام 1993، جزئيا من خلال البرامج التي تُديرها الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية ويمولها صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي. وقد توقف هذا التمويل منذ 31 يناير/ كانون الثاني 2019. وبحلول 30 سبتمبر/ أيلول 2020، كانت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية قد انفقت معظم أموال صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي التي تم تخصيصها لبرنامج الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة في السنوات المالية 2015-2019. على وجه التحديد، انفقت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية 487.3 مليون دولار من أصل 540.4 مليون دولار من مساعدات صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي للبرنامج في السنتين الماليتين 2015 و2016. وأعادت إدارة الرئيس ترامب برمجة الـ 230.1 مليون دولار التي كانت مخصصة للسنة المالية 2017 لبرامج أخرى ولم تخصص مبالغ للسنتين الماليتين 2018 و2019. وأعلنت السلطة الفلسطينية في شهر ديسمبر/ كانون الأول 2018 بأنها لن تقبل المساعدة بعد 31 يناير/ كانون الثاني 2019 بسبب مخاوف لديها بشأن قانون توضيح مكافحة الإرهاب (Anti-Terrorism Clarification Act) لعام 2018. ووفقاً لمسؤولين من وزارة الخارجية الأمريكية والوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية فإن القانون يتضمن أحكاماً يمكن أن تجعل الجهات المتلقية للمساعدات من صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي خاضعة لدعاوى قضائية أمريكية. وفي شهر يناير/ كانون الثاني 2021، أعلنت إدارة الرئيس بايدن نيتها إستئناف تقديم المساعدات الأمريكية للبرامج في الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة. اتخذت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية عدة خطوات بشأن المشاريع الجارية ومستويات التوظيف في بعثتها في الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة بعد توقف تقديم المساعدة للبرنامج اعتبارا من 31 يناير/ كانون الثاني 2019. وقد أوقفت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية 27 مشروعاً جارياً. كما توقفت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية عن إعادة شغل الوظائف المصرح بها في بعثتها في الضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة، واقترحت تخفيضا في قوة العمل، ووضعت حوالي 50 موظفا في مَهام مؤقتة لأنشطة أخرى. ووفقا للوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية، فإنه اعتبارا من شهر مايو/ أيار 2019، طلبت لجان الكونجرس من الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية تعليق تخفيض الوظائف المُخطط له انتظاراً لاستمرار المداولات. وفي حين أن الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية لم تنهِ عمل موظفيها، إلا أن عدد موظفي البعثة انخفض بنسبة 39 بالمئة من ديسمبر/ كانون الأول 2017 وحتى سبتمبر/ أيلول 2020 بسبب مُغادرة الموظفين للبعثة وعمليات النقل والاستقالات. تُحدد سياسات وإجراءات مكافحة الإرهاب للوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية والخاصة بالضفة الغربية وقطاع غزة ثلاثة متطلبات لمُتلقي التمويل من صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي: الفحص بالنسبة للعديد من الجهات غير الأمريكية التي تتلقى المساعدات، وشهادات مكافحة الإرهاب لمُتلقي المِنَح أو الاتفاقيات التعاونية، وأحكام إلزامية تهدف لمنع الدعم المالي للإرهاب في جميع مِنَح المساعدات للجهات الرئيسية والفرعية. توصل مكتب مساءلة الحكومة إلى أنه بالنسبة للسنوات المالية 2015-2019، امتثلت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية بشكل كامل لجميع المتطلبات الثلاثة عند منح المساعدات للجهات الرئيسية، غير أنها لم تتأكد بشكل متسق من إمتثال الجهات الفرعية الحاصلة على المساعدات. بالإضافة لذلك، أظهر تحليل مكتب مساءلة الحكومة لعيّنة المنح الفرعية القابلة للتعميم ومراجعات الامتثال الخاصة بالوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية وجود فجوات في الامتثال لمتطلبات الفحص والأحكام الإلزامية على مستوى المنح الفرعية. فعلى سبيل المثال، توصل التحليل الذي أجراه مكتب مساءلة الحكومة لمُراجعات الامتثال الخاصة بالوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية إلى أن 13 من أصل 86 تقريراً كان فيها حالة أو أكثر من عدم قيام الجهة الرئيسية الحاصلة على المنح بتضمين الأحكام الإلزامية، والتي تُغطي 420 من المنح الفرعية. قدمت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية تدريباً للجهات الرئيسية الحاصلة على المنح سابقاً على تقديم المساعدة حول متطلبات مكافحة الإرهاب بالنسبة للجهات التي تحصل على المنح الفرعية، غير أنها لم تتحقق من أن الجهات الحاصلة على المنح لديها إجراءات للامتثال لهذه المتطلبات. وبالإضافة لذلك، أجرت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية مراجعات للامتثال لاحقة على تقديم المنح الفرعية تمت بعد انتهاء المنحة الفرعية في بعض الأحيان، حيث كان الأوان قد فات لاتخاذ اجراءات تصحيحية. و في حالة استئناف تمويل صندوق الدعم الاقتصادي، فإن التحقق من أن الجهات الرئيسية الحاصلة على المنح لديها هذه الاجراءات، وإجراء مراجعات للامتثال لاحقة على تقديم المساعدة في وقت يسمح بإجراء التصحيحات من شأنه أن يضع الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية في وضع أفضل بالنسبة لتقليل مخاطر تقديم المساعدة للكيانات أو الافراد المرتبطين بالإرهاب. توصيات مكتب مساءلة الحكومة يوصي مكتب مساءلة الحكومة، في حالة استئناف التمويل، أن تقوم الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية بـ (1) التحقق من أن الجهات الرئيسية الحاصلة على المساعدة لديها إجراءات لضمان الامتثال للمتطلبات قبل تقديم المنح للجهات الفرعية، و (2) إجراء مراجعات الامتثال بعد منح المساعدات في وقت يسمح بإجراء التصحيحات قبل إنتهاء المنحة. وقد وافقت الوكالة الأمريكية للتنمية الدولية على هذه التوصيات. هذه نسخة بلغة أجنبية لتقرير صدر في مارس/ آذار2021. أﻧﻈﺮ اﻟﻮﺛﯿﻘﺔ21-332-GAO. ﻟﻠﻤﺰﯾﺪ ﻣﻦ اﻟﻤﻌﻠﻮﻣﺎت،ﯾﺮُ ﺟﻰ اﻻﺗﺼﺎل ﺑـ ﻻﺗﯿﺸﺎ ﻟﻮف Latesha Love ﻋﻠﻰ رﻗﻢ اﻟﮭﺎﺗﻒ: 4409-512 (202)، أو ﻣﻦ ﺧﻼل اﻹﯾﻤﯿﻞ: lovel@gao.gov
    [Read More…]
  • Deputy Secretary McKeon to Highlight Importance of International Education, Foreign Affairs Careers at Indiana University
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Nepali Constitution Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Mississippi Prison’s Deputy Warden Charged with Civil Rights Offense for Beating Inmate
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department announced yesterday that a federal grand jury indicted Melvin Hilson, 49, currently a deputy warden at the Mississippi State Penitentiary, for repeatedly striking an inmate and knocking him to the ground, resulting in injury to the inmate.
    [Read More…]
  • Guinea’s National Day
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Michael R. Pompeo, [Read More…]

Crime

Network News © 2005 Area.Control.Network™ All rights reserved.