December 3, 2021

News

News Network

Secretary Antony J. Blinken at a Meet and Greet with U.S. Embassy Personnel and Families

22 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Dakar, Senegal

U.S. Embassy

AMBASSADOR MUSHINGI:  Thank you.  Thank you very much.  I wonder which music is that?  (Laughter.)  I’ve heard it before, but I don’t remember where.

But anyway, it’s my great pleasure.  I’m delighted to see you all here for this special occasion and to give a warm welcome to our guests this afternoon.  It’s indeed a pleasure for me and for all of us to welcome Secretary Antony Blinken, colleagues from Washington that you will see around, including among them our Assistant Secretary Molly Phee, who is over there (applause); a senior director at the White House for African Affairs, Dana Banks, who is here (applause); and my friend who tried to make me keep the Secretary on time, but I failed, is our chief of staff for the Secretary, Suzy George, who is somewhere.  (Applause.)  Oh, she’s over there.  Oh good that she’s far away; she’ll not be giving me the big eyes, then I can ignore the time here.  (Laughter.)  Thank you.

I’m really happy to welcome them to this, our beautiful embassy.  By the way, Secretary, this is located at what we call the Pointe – (in French) – la Pointe des Almadies, which is just here, and which is also known as the westernmost point of the African mainland.  So to Teams USA in Dakar and Bissau, I’m very proud to be working with you.  And indeed, I express my gratitude to you and your family members for all your work on behalf of the American people.  Our vision here has always been a safer and more prosperous United States of America, a safer and more prosperous Senegal, and a safer and more prosperous Guinea Bissau.

And our slogan – let me see where we remember – it’s one team, one mission.  As in one team.

AUDIENCE:  One mission.

AMBASSADOR MUSHINGI:  There you go.  And we tell our Senegalese and Bissau-Guinean interlocutors (a) there is no Planet B – as in no Plan A, Plan B – no Planet B, (b) on this one planet that we have, talking about climate change, talking about prosperity, talking about everything, we are all in the same boat.  And what to do?  And therefore, if indeed we are in the same boat, we all need to row together in the same direction to produce results for the American people, the Senegalese people, and the Bissau-Guinean people

So let me hear it one more time.  One team.

AUDIENCE:  One mission.

AMBASSADOR MUSHINGI:  Or in our language, in your language.  Hatchendo.

AUDIENCE:  Dorondo.

AMBASSADOR MUSHINGI:  It’s not loud enough.  Hatchendo.

AUDIENCE:  Dorondo.

AMBASSADOR MUSHINGI:  So as the saying goes, save the best for last.  So – and Secretary Blinken chose Dakar as his last stop for his first visit to the African continent.  Perhaps he heard about the Thiéboudienne, the delicious dumpling.  We just had some at the president’s – at the palace, and I saw him take a full plate.  (Laughter.)  I looked at this plate, I’m like, “What did you take home?”  And then maybe he heard about like teraanga.  I heard him also repeat that word, teraanga.  Or maybe he heard about something else.  Personally, I think that he learned that Youssou N’Dour released a new album this week and wanted to hear the true essence of Mbalax music before returning home.  And we heard that he likes music.  (Applause.)

(Music played.)

AMBASSADOR MUSHINGI:  Mr. Secretary, the microphone is yours.  (Applause.)

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  That’s an impossible act to follow.  (Laughter.)  And I’m glad we heard some real music – (laughter) – because when we walked up here I was very concerned.  (Laughter.)

(In French.)  It is wonderful to experience firsthand the extraordinary hospitality and warmth of Senegal, of its people, of our colleagues, and it’s especially good to be with all of you.  Now I’m told, but I don’t know if this is right – but I’m told this may be your first post-pandemic, more or less post-pandemic gathering, so it’s great that everyone’s here in person outside together.  (Applause.)

And you have a great ambassador here.  (Cheers.)  And I should have said we have a great ambassador here.  (Cheers.)  Tuli, thank you for your four years of leadership here and for your many years of extraordinary service and leadership, service to the country.  We’re grateful for it.

And thank you to everyone here at Embassy Dakar for incredibly hard work over the last few years and especially, especially, for looking out for one another.  I know you’ve had virtual hails and farewells during COVID, you’ve got Locally Employed Staff Recognition Day in a few days, but let me start that by saying my own gratitude, my own recognition, for our locally employed team.  We could not do this without you.  You’re the lifeblood of this mission, the lifeblood of our missions everywhere in the world, and I thank you for it.  (Applause.)

Now, there are a few people I would like to mention and single out by name, and maybe they’re here.  Aminata Casse, there you are.  (Cheers.)  So you have done award-winning work recognized by President Macky Sall to improve Senegal’s firefighting capabilities.  Thank you for that (inaudible).  (Cheers.)

Tidiane Wone, are you here?  Where is Tidiane?  (Cheers.)  Ah, there you are.  Thank you for chairing the Locally Employed Staff Committee.  It means a lot.  We really appreciate that.  We appreciate your leadership.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

And Ndeye Fatou Wilane, are you here?  (Cheers.)  Thank you for your wonderful work telling the story of Embassy Dakar, especially over the last year.  We really appreciate that as well.  (Applause.)

And finally, Adama Sembene, are you here?

STAFF:  She’s not here.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  No?  Alioune Mody Ndiaye, are you here?  Well, let me simply say for both of them, 32 years of service.  (Cheers.)  That’s extraordinary and we are so grateful to have you as colleagues.  Please extend my appreciation to them.  (Applause.)

So we’ve had 60 years of diplomatic partnership, diplomatic relations with Senegal, and we just went through the multipurpose room with photos of every American president going back to President Kennedy with the leaders of Senegal.  And today I had a chance to see the incredible diversity and the strength of our relationship with Senegal.

We had, as the ambassador will tell you and will no doubt relate, a really wonderful visit working with our colleagues, including with President Sall, with the foreign minister, a commercial diplomacy event with the minister of the economy and American companies that are working on investments here in Senegal, very inspiring roundtable discussions with women technology and business leaders, a tour just now of the Institut Pasteur de Dakar, where we’re seeing cutting-edge work being done on vaccines now for yellow fever and eventually for COVID and other pandemics.

And that gets me to one thing I wanted to share with you.  I know that for people in this mission as well as for our missions around the world, this has been over the last couple of years a very difficult journey because of COVID-19.  And I know that you’ve recently emerged from a difficult third wave.  But I want to say thank you because you’ve kept going, you’ve supported each other, and you’ve helped Senegal’s COVID-19 response.

Now, I don’t know if they’re here, but Dr. Jay Lee and Omer Pasi, where are you?  (Cheers.)  You and your medical team have kept this mission safe with vaccines.  You provided accurate and timely information to all of our people.  I can’t thank you enough for doing that.

And Fama Gueye, are you here?  (Cheers.)  I understand you kept everyone connected.  And especially in challenging times like COVID-19, keeping people connected – thank you, thank you, thank you.  (Inaudible.)  (Applause.)

To those of you who helped facilitate the provision of vaccines to Senegal – more than a million so far – you’ve made a huge difference.  You have literally, literally saved lives.  Some of you helped to build up Senegal’s health systems, and those of you who helped ramp up vaccine manufacturing at Institut Pasteur, again, you’re making a real difference in people’s lives.

The other thing I want to talk about briefly is the work that we’re doing, that you’re doing, on commercial diplomacy, on investing in the future of this country and the future of our relationship.  We’ve got more American companies doing business here in Senegal than ever before, and that is only going to grow thanks to your work.  We’ve got the first direct Dakar-New York flight, and this embassy is hard at work driving more commercial diplomacy.  We signed a number of Memorandum of Understanding today with four leading companies that will help invest and grow and strengthen the infrastructure here in Senegal, and that’s going to make a difference in people’s lives too.

And they represent what I know Tuli likes to call the American model, deals that represent good jobs for the United States and for the people of Senegal.  So thank you very much to the economic team, the business team, for pushing that.

A couple other things to mention.  To all of you, you’re doing outstanding work representing our country here in Dakar.  We need to do our part at the State Department to make sure that this is the best workplace that it can be.  Last month, I put out a modernization agenda for the department, something we just launched.  And there are a few things that we’re going to try and do over the next couple of years.  We’re going to work to build our capacity and expertise in new areas, because so much of what you’re called upon to do in dealing with climate change, in dealing with pandemics, in building our economic relationships, so much of that depends on new skills that we want to make sure the department develops and that you develop.

We want to make sure that new voices are brought to the fore in thinking about and innovating in our policy, and we have new ways to do that.  We want to make sure that not only are we building but we’re retaining a diverse workforce, and that means addressing some of the quality of life and work-life balance issues that I know so many of you have.  We’re modernizing our tech, our communications, our analytical capabilities, and we’re going to be reinvigorating in-person diplomacy and public engagement because that’s at the heart of what you do, that’s at the heart of what we do.

The bottom line is this:  We want the department, this department that we share, to be as effective as it can be in the world, and we want you to have the tools and the support that you need to do your job as well as you can.

So as I said yesterday in Nigeria, we are looking to strengthen our partnerships across Africa, including here in Senegal, because this continent will make the difference on so many challenges and opportunities of our time.  You know this so well:  Over the next 25 or 30 years, one in four people on Planet Earth will be African.  Africa is part of our common future, and I want to make sure it’s part of our common present.  That’s what we’re going to be doing over the next couple of years.

And the work you’re doing here in Senegal is a vital piece of that effort.  So whether you started at the embassy last week or whether you’re into your third decade of service; whether you’re Foreign Service, Civil Service, Locally Employed Staff, a family member, a contractor; whether you’re here with one of the other agencies that work together as part of our family, I really just wanted to come by and say very simply thank you.  Thank you for the great work that you do on behalf of the United States.  Thank you for the great work that you do bringing Senegal and the United States together.  Thank you for your service to the American people.  I’m grateful for it.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

More from: Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State
More from Area Control Network
1. Global Warming Network
2. Christians Online
3. Put your website in the archives
4. Area Control Network News

News Network

  • U.S. Delegation Meeting with Taliban Representatives
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • New York City Police Department Officer Charged with Acting As an Illegal Agent of the People’s Republic of China
    In Crime News
    A criminal complaint was unsealed today in federal court in the Eastern District of New York charging Baimadajie Angwang, 33, a New York City Police Department officer and United States Army reservist, with acting as an illegal agent of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) as well as committing wire fraud, making false statements and obstructing an official proceeding. Angwang was arrested earlier today in Williston Park, New York, and his initial appearance is scheduled for this afternoon before United States Magistrate Judge Peggy Kuo at the United States Courthouse in Brooklyn, New York.
    [Read More…]
  • One of the Nation’s Largest Chicken Producers Pleads Guilty to Price Fixing and is Sentenced to a $107 Million Criminal Fine
    In Crime News
    Pilgrim’s Pride Corporation (Pilgrim’s), a major broiler chicken producer based in Greeley, Colorado, has pleaded guilty and has been sentenced to pay approximately $107 million in criminal fines for its participation in a conspiracy to fix prices and rig bids for broiler chicken products, the Department of Justice announced today.
    [Read More…]
  • Belgium Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]
  • COVID-19: Efforts to Increase Vaccine Availability and Perspectives on Initial Implementation
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found The federal government has taken several actions to increase the availability of COVID-19 vaccine doses and indicated it expects to have enough doses available for all adults in the United States by the end of May. As of April 1, 2021, the government had purchased 1.2 billion doses of one- and two-dose regimen vaccines. Also, vaccine companies reported making additional manufacturing sites operational, among other actions to expand capacity and mitigate challenges. Federal officials said projecting future availability of vaccine doses can be difficult, in part because of uncertainty surrounding complex manufacturing processes. Given this uncertainty, coupled with the significant manufacturing and distribution increases needed to have enough vaccine doses available for all adults, managing public expectations is critical. GAO's prior work has found that timely, clear, and consistent communication about vaccine availability is essential to ensure public confidence and trust, especially as initial vaccine implementation did not match expectations. COVID-19 Vaccination Site Stakeholders GAO interviewed identified challenges with initial COVID-19 vaccine implementation. For example, some stakeholders said states often did not have information critical to distribution at the local level, such as how many doses they would receive and when. The federal government has begun initiatives—outlined in a national response strategy—to improve implementation, such as creating new vaccination sites. In its March 2021 distribution strategy, CDC provided a high-level description of its activities and noted that more details would be included in future reports to Congress. To meet the expectations set by recent announcements, such as the planned expansion of vaccine eligibility to all adults and the introduction of tools to help individuals find vaccines, it will be imperative that the federal government effectively coordinate and communicate its plans, as GAO recommended in September 2020. Why GAO Did This Study Providing the public with safe and effective vaccines to prevent COVID-19 is crucial to mitigating the public health and economic impacts of the disease. The U.S. had almost 30 million reported cases and over 545,000 reported deaths as of March 27, 2021. The federal government took a critical step in December 2020 in authorizing the first two COVID-19 vaccines and beginning distribution of doses across the nation. The government had distributed about 180.6 million vaccine doses, and about 147.8 million doses had been administered, as of March 27, 2021, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. The CARES Act includes a provision for GAO to report on its ongoing monitoring and oversight efforts related to the COVID-19 pandemic. This report examines, among other issues, actions the federal government has taken to increase the availability of COVID-19 vaccine doses, and challenges with initial vaccine implementation—that is, prioritizing, allocating, distributing, and administering vaccine doses—identified by stakeholders and steps the federal government has taken to improve vaccine implementation. GAO reviewed documents from the Departments of Defense and Health and Human Services, transcripts of public briefings, data from CDC, and interviewed or received written responses from federal officials, vaccine company representatives, and select public health stakeholders. GAO incorporated technical comments from the Department of Defense, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency as appropriate. For more information, contact Alyssa M. Hundrup at (202) 512-7114 or hundrupa@gao.gov.
    [Read More…]
  • Request for Statements of Interest: FY20 China Programs
    In Human Health, Resources and Services
    Bureau of Democracy, [Read More…]
  • Remarks by Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen on the Settlement of Clean Air Act Claims against Daimler AG and Mercedes-Benz USA LLC
    In Crime News
    Remarks as Prepared for [Read More…]
  • Federal Court Permanently Enjoins Tax Return Preparers in Louisiana
    In Crime News
    A federal court in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana has permanently enjoined two New Orleans-area tax return preparers from preparing returns for others and from owning, operating, or franchising any tax return preparation business in the future.
    [Read More…]
  • Zimbabwe Travel Advisory
    In Travel
    Reconsider travel to [Read More…]
  • U.S.-India Joint Statement on Launching the “U.S.-India Climate and Clean Energy Agenda 2030 Partnership”
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Office of the [Read More…]
  • Remarks by Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers on ISIS Militants Charged with Deaths of Americans in Syria
    In Crime News
    Good morning.  I’m [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken at Bastille Day Celebration
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of African Affairs Ervin Massinga On Secretary Blinken’s Upcoming Travel to Kenya, Nigeria, and Senegal
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Ervin Massinga, [Read More…]
  • Secretary Antony J. Blinken With Jake Tapper of State of the Union on CNN
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Antony J. Blinken, [Read More…]
  • Foreign Police Assistance: Defined Roles and Improved Information Sharing Could Enhance Interagency Collaboration
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found The United States provided an estimated $13.9 billion for foreign police assistance during fiscal years 2009 through 2011. Funds provided by U.S. agencies rose and then fell between fiscal years 2009 and 2011. During fiscal years 2009 through 2011, the United States provided the greatest amount of its foreign police assistance to Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Colombia, Mexico, and the Palestinian Territories. Department of Defense (DOD) and State (State) funds constituted about 97 percent of U.S. funds for police assistance in fiscal year 2009 and 98 percent in fiscal years 2010 and 2011. DOD and State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (State/INL) have acknowledged limitations in their procedures to assess and evaluate their foreign police assistance activities and are taking steps to address them. DOD assesses the performance of the police forces it trains and equips in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Pakistan. However, the assessment process for Afghanistan does not provide data on civil policing effectiveness. DOD plans to expand its assessments to obtain data to assess the ability of these forces to conduct civil policing operations. In addition, recognizing that it had conducted only one evaluation of its foreign police assistance activities because it lacked guidelines, State/INL is developing an evaluation plan that is consistent with State’s February 2012 Evaluation Policy. This evaluation plan includes conducting evaluations for its largest programs in Iraq and Mexico. U.S. agencies have implemented various mechanisms to coordinate their foreign police assistance activities as part of wider foreign assistance activities, such as the National Security Council’s (NSC)-led interagency policy committees that coordinate policies at a high level and various working groups at the overseas posts. However, GAO noted some areas for improvement. Specifically, NSC has not defined agencies’ roles and responsibilities for assisting foreign police. Further, DOD and State do not consistently share and document information. For example, DOD did not provide copies of its capability assessments of the Iraqi police to State, which is now responsible for police development in Iraq, because it destroyed the database containing the assessments at the end of its mission to train the police. Further, some U.S. embassies, including the one in Bogotá, Colombia, do not publish agendas or minutes of their proceedings. Why GAO Did This Study In April 2011, we reported that the United States provided an estimated $3.5 billion for foreign police assistance to 107 countries during fiscal year 2009. We agreed to follow up that report with a review of the extent to which U.S. agencies evaluated and coordinated their foreign police assistance activities. As such, this report (1) updates our analysis of the funding U.S. agencies provided for foreign police assistance during fiscal years 2009 through 2011, (2) examines the extent to which DOD and State/INL assess or evaluate their activities for countries with the largest programs, and (3) examines the mechanisms U.S. agencies use to coordinate foreign police assistance activities. GAO focused on DOD and State because they have the largest foreign police assistance programs. GAO analyzed program and budget documents and interviewed officials from DOD, State, Energy, the U.S. Agency for International Development, Justice, the Treasury, and Homeland Security.
    [Read More…]
  • Mississippi Pharmacist and Louisiana Marketer Plead Guilty to More Than $180 Million Health Care Fraud Scheme
    In Crime News
    A Mississippi pharmacist pleaded guilty today and a Louisiana marketer pleaded guilty on Aug. 12 in the Southern District of Mississippi for their roles in a multi-million-dollar scheme to defraud TRICARE and private insurance companies by paying kickbacks to distributors for the referral of medically unnecessary prescriptions. The conduct allegedly resulted in more than $180 million in fraudulent billings, including more than $50 million paid by federal health care programs.
    [Read More…]
  • HHS Leverages Public Feedback to Advance Landscape Analysis on Emerging Technologies for Aging, Underserved Populations
    In Human Health, Resources and Services
    February 3, 2021 By: [Read More…]
  • Five Charged in Scheme to Export Thermal Imaging Scopes and Night Vision Goggles to Russia, in Violation of Arms Export Control Act
    In Crime News
    A federal grand jury in Los Angeles unsealed an indictment Thursday that accuses five defendants of conspiring to unlawfully export defense articles to Russia. Specifically, the defendants allegedly exported thermal imaging riflescopes and night-vision goggles without a license, in violation of the Arms Export Control Act.
    [Read More…]
  • Global War on Terrorism: Reported Obligations for the Department of Defense
    In U.S GAO News
    Since 2001, Congress has provided the Department of Defense (DOD) with hundreds of billions of dollars in supplemental and annual appropriations for military operations in support of the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT). DOD's reported annual obligations for GWOT have shown a steady increase from about $0.2 billion in fiscal year 2001 to about $139.8 billion in fiscal year 2007. In fiscal year 2007, Congress provided DOD with about $161.8 billion in annual and supplemental appropriations3 for GWOT. To continue its GWOT operations, DOD has requested $189. billion in appropriations for fiscal year 2008. As of December 2007, Congress has provided DOD with about $86.8 billion for GWOT in fiscal year 2008, including $16.8 billion for Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles. DOD has reported obligations of about $23.8 billion for GWOT for fiscal year 2008 through November 2007. The United States' commitments to GWOT will likely involve the continued investment of significant resources, requiring decision makers to consider difficult trade-offs as the nation faces an increasing long-range fiscal challenge. The magnitude of future costs will depend on several direct and indirect cost variables and, in some cases, decisions that have not yet been made. DOD's future costs will likely be affected by the pace and duration of operations, the types of facilities needed to support troops overseas, redeployment plans, and the amount of equipment to be repaired or replaced. DOD compiles and reports monthly and cumulative incremental obligations incurred to support GWOT in a monthly Supplemental and Cost of War Execution Report. DOD leadership uses this report, along with other information, to advise Congress on the costs of the war and to formulate future GWOT budget requests. DOD reports these obligations by appropriation, contingency operation, and military service or defense agency. The monthly cost reports are typically compiled in the 45 days after the end of the reporting month in which the obligations are incurred. DOD has prepared monthly reports on the obligations incurred for its involvement in GWOT since fiscal year 2001. Section 1221 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006 requires us to submit quarterly updates to Congress on the costs of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom based on DOD's monthly Supplemental and Cost of War Execution Reports. This report, which responds to this requirement, contains our analysis of DOD's reported obligations for military operations in support of GWOT through September 2007. Specifically, we assessed (1) DOD's appropriations and reported obligations for military operations in support of GWOT through fiscal year 2007 and (2) DOD's fiscal year 2007 reported obligations for GWOT by military service and appropriation account.From fiscal year 2001 through fiscal year 2007, Congress has provided DOD with about $542.9 billion for its efforts in support of GWOT. DOD has reported obligations of about $492.2 billion for military operations in support of the war from fiscal years 2001 through 2007. The $50.7 billion difference between DOD's GWOT appropriations and reported obligations can generally be attributed to multiyear funding for procurement; military construction; and research, development, test, and evaluation from previous GWOT-related appropriations that have yet to be obligated, and obligations for classified activities, which are not included in DOD's reported obligations. DOD's total reported obligations related to GWOT have demonstrated a steady annual increase each fiscal year through 2007. DOD's reported obligations of about $139.8 billion in fiscal year 2007 were approximately 1.4 times higher than reported GWOT obligations of about $98.4 billion for fiscal year 2006. The higher reported obligations in fiscal year 2007 are largely due to costs associated with Operation Iraqi Freedom, in part due to the surge strategy announced in January 2007, which provided for the deployment of additional troops. DOD's reported obligations through fiscal year 2007 include about $378.1 billion for operations in and around Iraq as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom, and about $86.2 billion for operations in Afghanistan, the Horn of Africa, the Philippines, and elsewhere as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. It also includes about $27.9 billion for operations in defense of the homeland as part of Operation Noble Eagle. Reported obligations associated with Operation Iraqi Freedom continue to be far higher than those for other GWOT operations in fiscal year 2007. From fiscal years 2003 through 2007, DOD's reported obligations for Operation Iraqi Freedom consistently increased each fiscal year. In contrast, DOD's reported obligations for Operation Noble Eagle have consistently decreased since fiscal year 2003, while those for Operation Enduring Freedom have remained within a range of $10.3 billion to $20.1 billion each fiscal year. DOD's reported obligations for fiscal year 2007 totaled $139.8 billion. The Army accounts for the largest proportion of reported obligations for fiscal year 2007--about $98.0 billion, nearly eight times higher than the almost $12.9 billion in obligations reported for the Air Force, the military service with the next greatest reported amount. Among appropriation accounts, operation and maintenance, which include items such as support for housing, food, and services; the repair of equipment; and transportation to move people, supplies, and equipment, accounts for the largest reported obligations--about $74.9 billion. Reported obligations for procurement account for about a quarter of total reported obligations or about $35.8 billion. Of the $43.6 billion provided to DOD for procurement in fiscal year 2007, approximately 34 percent or $14.3 billion, remained available for use in fiscal year 2008.
    [Read More…]
  • Whither Arms Control in Outer Space? Space Threats, Space Hypocrisy, and the Hope of Space Norms
    In Crime Control and Security News
    Dr. Christopher Ashley [Read More…]

Crime

Network News © 2005 Area.Control.Network™ All rights reserved.