December 5, 2021

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Secretary Antony J. Blinken and United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson Before Their Meeting

10 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

London, United Kingdom

No. 10 Downing

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  Good afternoon.  Always a great pleasure to welcome the U.S. Secretary of State.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  And congratulations again for your achievement and how wonderful to have you here.  And I’ve been admiring what you’ve been saying since you’ve been here.  How long have you actually been here?

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  It feels like – we’ve gotten so much work done, thanks to Dominic and the team.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  Good, good.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  But it’s been about 24 hours.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  24 hours.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Built a lot of capacity.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  Good.  Well, it’s great to see you.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  And I’m just so, so pleased to be here and so pleased to see you again.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  Lovely to see you.  I think we last saw each other at the UN —

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  That’s right.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  — where we were – you were – talking with our friend Mr. Sergey Lavrov, who we both admire in a kind of way.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Indeed.

PRIME MINISTER JOHNSON:  Anyway, listen, everybody.  I think the U.S. Secretary and I – Tony and I are going to have a bit of a full discussion now, if that’s okay.  Thank you all very much for your time.

SECRETARY BLINKEN:  Thank you.

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