January 20, 2022

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Saudi National Day

10 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States, I wish to extend to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Saudi people a joyous National Day.

This year, our two countries are celebrating the 75th anniversary of the historic meeting between President Roosevelt and King Abdulaziz aboard the U.S.S. Quincy, a meeting which laid the foundation for the strong strategic partnership the United States and Saudi Arabia enjoy today. This partnership has been at the heart of our progress on many shared priorities, including the stability of the Gulf region, energy security, and economic growth and prosperity in both our countries. Strengthening the close ties between our governments and our people is even more important this year as the Kingdom holds the G20 Presidency and the world confronts a global pandemic.

I wish the Saudi people peace, prosperity, and good health as you celebrate your National Day.

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