December 4, 2021

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Rewards for Information to Bring Mexican Drug Traffickers to Justice

15 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The U.S. Department of State is announcing reward offers of up to $5 million each for information leading to the arrest or conviction of four Mexican drug traffickers operating in the Mexican states of Chihuahua and Sinaloa.  Aureliano Guzman-Loera, the brother of former Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquin Guzman-Loera, and brothers Ruperto Salgueiro-Nevarez, Jose Salgueiro-Nevarez, and Heriberto Salgueiro-Nevarez all operate under the umbrella of the Sinaloa Cartel federation.  Aureliano Guzman-Loera and the Salgueiro-Nevarez brothers are charged in U.S. indictments for violation of U.S. drug laws, to include international conspiracies to distribute marijuana, cocaine, methamphetamine, and fentanyl.

This reward offer complements the Department of Justice’s announcement today of indictments charging Aureliano Guzman-Loera and the three Salgueiro-Nevarez brothers for violating international narcotics trafficking laws.  One of the indictments alleges the trafficking of fentanyl, which is responsible for more than 63 percent of the 96,779 drug overdose deaths in the United States between March 2020 and 2021.  Together, these actions are part of a whole-of-government effort to combat drug trafficking and transnational organized crime globally and in Mexico.

This reward is offered under the Department of State’s Narcotics Rewards Program (NRP).   More than 75 transnational criminals and major narcotics traffickers have been brought to justice under the NRP and the Transnational Organized Crime Rewards Program (TOCRP) since the NRP’s inception in 1986.  The Department has paid more than $135 million in rewards for information leading to apprehensions.

The Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs manages the NRP in close coordination with the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations, and other U.S. government agencies.  These actions demonstrate the Department’s commitment to supporting law enforcement efforts to bring transnational criminals to justice.

For more information on the individuals listed above and the NRP and TOCRP, please see https://www.state.gov/bureau-of-international-narcotics-and-law-enforcement-affairs/inl-rewards-program/.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson
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