January 19, 2022

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Republic of the Congo Travel Advisory

11 min read

Reconsider travel to the Republic of the Congo due to COVID-19.  Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Republic of the Congo due to COVID-19.   

The Republic of the Congo has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Republic of the Congo. 

Reconsider travel to:

  • The southern and western districts of the Pool Region due to potential civil unrest.  

Country Summary: While not common, violent crime, such as armed robbery and assault, remains a concern throughout the Republic of the Congo.

Political demonstrations can be unpredictable and violent.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside Brazzaville. U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to the Pool Region because of ongoing violence. They must also obtain special permission to travel to Pointe Noire’s beaches due to crime.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Republic of the Congo:

The Southern and Western Districts of the Pool Region—Do Not Travel

The December 2017 ceasefire in the Pool region is holding, but the potential for civil unrest exists. The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in the Pool Region as U.S. government employees must obtain special authorization to travel to and through the area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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