January 23, 2022

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Republic of Korea’s National Day

15 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I send best wishes and congratulations to the people of the Republic of Korea as you celebrate your National Day on August 15. 

The U.S.-Republic of Korea Alliance has stood as the linchpin of peace, security, and prosperity in the Indo-Pacific and beyond for nearly seven decades, and we are proud to stand with you as we work together to tackle the most pressing global challenges of the 21st century.

The friendship and the alliance between our two countries is ironclad, and we will continue to stand shoulder-to-shoulder with the government and the people of the Republic of Korea as we strive to achieve a more prosperous and secure future.

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