December 4, 2021

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Repeat Child Sex Offender Sentenced to 108 Months in Prison for Attempted Sex Abuse in Vietnam

11 min read
<div>A U.S. citizen residing outside the United States was sentenced today to 108 months in prison for attempting to molest an 11-year-old boy in Vietnam.</div>
A U.S. citizen residing outside the United States was sentenced today to 108 months in prison for attempting to molest an 11-year-old boy in Vietnam.

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