January 22, 2022

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Release of the U.S. Strategy to Prevent Conflict and Promote Stability

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Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

America’s prosperity and security depend on peaceful, self-reliant, U.S. economic and security partners.  By breaking the costly cycle of conflict and instability, the United States advances its own security.  Today, the Department of State released the U.S Strategy to Prevent Conflict and Promote Stability.  This Strategy sets forth a framework for U.S. government efforts to prevent conflict, stabilize conflict-affected areas, and address global fragility, in line with the Global Fragility Act of 2019.  The Strategy will reinforce the National Security Strategy, which commits the United States to strengthening the resilience of communities and states “where state weakness or failure would magnify threats to the American homeland.”

The Strategy emphasizes bilateral, multilateral, public-private, and civil society partnerships.  It elevates prevention and facilitates an integrated U.S. response.  It was developed through extensive consultations with stakeholders and partners, including civil society experts, non‑governmental organizations, government partners, and multilateral agencies.  The United States is committed to sustaining a consultative, collaborative approach throughout Strategy implementation, monitoring, and evaluation.

Read the Strategy here.

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