January 25, 2022

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Release of the Climate Adaptation and Resilience Plan

12 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The climate crisis poses a serious threat to the Department of State’s mission of advancing the interests, health, safety, and economic prosperity of the American people.  With thousands of personnel spread out over 270 posts in 190 countries, the Department understands the urgency of frequent extreme weather events and other climate impacts taking place around the world and is committed to enhancing resilience in our workforce, facilities, and operations.

In response to E.O. 14008 “Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad,” the Department of State has released its 2021 Climate Adaptation and Resilience Plan, which will be implemented in FY 2022 and reviewed and updated annually.  The plan commits the Department to assessing our immediate and long-term vulnerabilities to climate hazards and outlines five priority actions to advance our operational resilience and adapt to climate change.  These actions include enhancing mobility in the workforce; improving emergency management planning and preparedness; enabling climate-ready sites and facilities; evaluating climate risks in supply chain and procurement; and improving local infrastructure through host country engagement.  These efforts model U.S. climate innovation and leadership abroad.

The Climate Adaptation and Resilience Plan complements the forthcoming Sustainability Plan, which will set the Department on a trajectory to meet the Administration’s ambitious federal sustainability and greenhouse gas reduction goals.

For additional information, access the 2021 Climate Adaptation and Resilience Plan at www.state.gov/office-of-management-strategy-and-solutions/reports-and-scorecards/.

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