December 9, 2021

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Readout of Acting CT Coordinator Godfrey’s Travel to Malta

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Office of the Spokesperson

Acting Counterterrorism Coordinator John Godfrey traveled to Valetta, Malta to co-chair the annual meeting of the Governing Board of Administrators for the International Institute for Justice and the Rule of Law (IIJ) this week.  In Malta, Coordinator Godfrey also met with Christopher Cutajar, Malta’s Permanent Secretary at the Ministry for Foreign and European Affairs, to discuss issues of mutual interest, including Libya and countering the financing of terrorism.

Since its founding in 2014, the IIJ has become a preeminent center for building the capacity of law enforcement and justice sector practitioners whose responsibilities include counterterrorism.  The IIJ has trained over 7,000 lawmakers, police, prosecutors, judges, corrections officials, and other justice stakeholders from over 123 countries in the last seven years.

 

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