December 4, 2021

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Readout of Meeting between Department of Justice and the Central Bureau of Investigation of Government of India

5 min read
<div>Deputy Assistant Attorney General Arun G. Rao of the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Division’s Consumer Protection Branch, together with colleagues from the Consumer Protection Branch and the FBI, met this week with Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) officials in New Delhi to further strengthen law enforcement cooperation. They discussed means for combating emerging crime trends, including fighting rising telemarketing fraud.</div>
Deputy Assistant Attorney General Arun G. Rao of the U.S. Department of Justice Civil Division’s Consumer Protection Branch, together with colleagues from the Consumer Protection Branch and the FBI, met this week with Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) officials in New Delhi to further strengthen law enforcement cooperation. They discussed means for combating emerging crime trends, including fighting rising telemarketing fraud.

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