December 6, 2021

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Readout of Attorney General Merrick B. Garland’s Call with the United Kingdom’s Home Secretary Priti Patel

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<div>Attorney General Merrick B. Garland spoke by phone yesterday with Priti Patel, the United Kingdom’s Home Secretary. In this inaugural conversation, the Attorney General and Home Secretary reaffirmed their shared commitment to deepening cooperation on countering common threats, including those posed by international terrorism.</div>
Attorney General Merrick B. Garland spoke by phone yesterday with Priti Patel, the United Kingdom’s Home Secretary. In this inaugural conversation, the Attorney General and Home Secretary reaffirmed their shared commitment to deepening cooperation on countering common threats, including those posed by international terrorism.

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