January 25, 2022

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Promoting Accountability for Those Responsible for Violence Against Protestors in Burma

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Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States stands in solidarity with the people of Burma who came out across the country with courage and determination today to reject the military coup and voice their aspirations for a return to democratic governance, peace, and rule of law.  We condemn the security forces’ brutal attacks on unarmed protesters, which resulted in four deaths and injured over 40 individuals.  We also condemn the ongoing arrests and detentions of hundreds of politicians, human rights defenders, and peaceful protestors.  The United States, in close coordination with our partners and allies, has underscored to the military that violence against the people is unacceptable.

Today, the United States is responding by designating two additional State Administrative Council (SAC) members, Maung Maung Kyaw and Moe Myint Tun.  These designations were made pursuant to Section 1(a)(iii)(A) of Executive Order (E.O.) 14014, “Blocking Property With Respect to the Situation in Burma.”

We call on the military and police to cease all attacks on peaceful protesters, immediately release all those unjustly detained, stop attacks on and intimidation of journalists and activists, and restore the democratically elected government.  The United States will continue to work with a broad coalition of international partners to promote accountability for coup leaders and those responsible for this violence.  We will not hesitate to take further action against those who perpetrate violence and suppress the will of the people.  We will not waver in our support for the people of Burma.

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