December 4, 2021

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Previously Convicted Felon Indicted for Illegally Transporting and Storing Hazardous Waste, Falsifying a Hazardous Waste Manifest and Obstructing an Agency Proceeding

9 min read
<div>A federal grand jury in Hawaii returned an indictment against Anthony Shane Gilstrap, 54, for violating the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by transporting hazardous waste without a required manifest, falsifying a hazardous waste manifest, and storing hazardous waste without a permit. He is also charged with obstructing an agency proceeding.</div>
A federal grand jury in Hawaii returned an indictment against Anthony Shane Gilstrap, 54, for violating the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by transporting hazardous waste without a required manifest, falsifying a hazardous waste manifest, and storing hazardous waste without a permit. He is also charged with obstructing an agency proceeding.

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