December 3, 2021

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Owner of a Tanker Company Sentenced to Prison for Lying to OSHA, Violating DOT Safety Standards

22 min read
<div>An Idaho man was sentenced to a month in prison, five months’ home confinement, three years’ supervised release, and a $15,000 fine today for lying to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and for making an illegal repair to a cargo tanker in violation of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act.</div>
An Idaho man was sentenced to a month in prison, five months’ home confinement, three years’ supervised release, and a $15,000 fine today for lying to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and for making an illegal repair to a cargo tanker in violation of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act.

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