January 25, 2022

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Our Deepest Condolences on the Passing of His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah

10 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

We are deeply saddened to hear of the death of His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah.  We extend our sincere condolences to his family and to the people of Kuwait.  His vision shaped Kuwait into the prosperous and modern state it is today, and his global leadership resulted in lasting and positive change in Kuwait and the entire Middle East region.  His Highness Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah was a revered leader and a friend to all nations.  The United States deeply valued the Amir’s strong partnership in promoting regional stability and security, as demonstrated by President Trump awarding the prestigious Legion of Merit, Degree Chief Commander to him as a token of our great appreciation.  We especially appreciated his efforts to facilitate Gulf unity and his humanitarianism. We honor his legacy and remain committed to our strong partnership and friendship with Kuwait.

 

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