January 19, 2022

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On U.S. Dedication to Human Rights

15 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States has been, and always will be, a leader in transparent, rights-respecting governance. Our continued commitment to the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) process underscores the United States’ long-standing role as a global leader in advancing human rights.

As a country whose government derives its authority from the consent of its people, respect for human rights is intrinsic to our national identity. We are committed to the promotion and protection of human rights, as reflected in our own founding documents and the principles of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, to which the United States and all other members of the United Nations have committed. As our UPR report and presentation clearly demonstrate, the people of the United States demand and our democratic institutions have long proven that they will protect their human rights.

We don’t simply discuss human rights in the United States; we cherish and defend them.

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