December 4, 2021

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On the Occasion of Eid al-Fitr

13 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

I extend my warmest wishes to all Muslims in the United States and around the world celebrating Eid al-Fitr.

On this Eid al-Fitr, we reflect on the values of charity, community, cooperation, and compassion, and, in the face of a global pandemic, we honor the Muslims worldwide who came together to pray and fast with their families, instead of with their larger communities.  These sacrifices have not gone unnoticed and have helped in keeping all communities safe and healthy.  We further recognize the contributions of Muslim frontline workers throughout the tragedy of this pandemic.  Their selflessness is an inspiration to us all.

We also keep in our thoughts those who have experienced hardships and have fled violence, along with those who have helped them on their journey, reminding us all to continue to work locally and globally – not just to save lives – but to restore dignity and understanding for all people, especially during this extraordinary time of need.

I regret very much that I am unable to host an Eid al-Fitr celebration this year due to the pandemic, but I will continue to forge and deepen the strong relationships we enjoy with diverse Muslim communities.  I wish you all a happy Eid al-Fitr.  Eid Mubarak.

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