January 25, 2022

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On the Fifth Anniversary of the Murder of Xulhaz Mannan

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Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

Five years ago, human rights activist Xulhaz Mannan and his fellow advocate Mahbub Rabbi Tonoy were murdered for their courageous work on behalf of marginalized communities in Bangladesh.  On the anniversary of his death, we stand with Xulhaz’s family and friends and honor his commitment to creating a world in which all can live with dignity.

Xulhaz served for nine years as the Protocol Specialist for the U.S. Embassy in Dhaka before joining USAID Bangladesh’s Office of Democracy and Governance, where he helped lead programs to promote human rights.  Xulhaz’s selfless dedication to advancing the principles of diversity, acceptance, and inclusion exemplified the best of Bangladesh, as did his generosity of spirit, devotion to family, and dedication to community.  Today, we honor his fearless advocacy on behalf of his fellow Bangladeshis and recommit to upholding the dignity and human rights of people around the world.

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