January 25, 2022

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On the Australian Sanctions Regime

14 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States commends Australia on passing legislation that strengthens its sanctions regime to address more comprehensively human rights abuses, corruption, malicious cyber activity, violations of international humanitarian law, and Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) proliferation globally — all of which threaten international peace and security. The new legislation will enhance U.S.-Australia cooperation on defending human rights and combatting corruption.

Together with other allies and partners, the United States and Australia will seek to promote our shared democratic values with similar tools and continue to call on international partners to adopt sanctions structures that can address these challenges to democratic ideals.  Human rights abusers, corrupt and malign actors, transnational criminals, and those who seek to proliferate WMD, no matter where they are located, will not have access to our financial systems.  The United States looks forward to continuing our partnership with Australia, other like-minded governments, and civil society alike to defend human rights, combat corruption, promote responsible behavior in cyberspace, and promote accountability and good governance.

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