January 19, 2022

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Oman Travel Advisory

12 min read

Do not travel to Oman due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Oman due to COVID-19.  

Travelers to Oman may experience border closures, airport closures, travel prohibitions, stay at home orders, business closures, and other emergency conditions within Oman due to COVID-19. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Oman.

Do not travel to:

  • The Yemen border area due to terrorism and armed conflict.

Due to risks to civil aviation operating within the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman region, including Oman, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued an advisory Notice to Airmen (NOTAM) and/or a Special Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR). For more information U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Oman:

Yemen Border Area

Terrorist attacks and violence continue in Yemen. Crossing the border into Yemen can be dangerous, and U.S. citizens who attempt to cross the Oman-Yemen border, from either Oman or Yemen, may be detained by Omani authorities.

Visit our website for High-Risk Travelers.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

News Network

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