December 3, 2021

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Semiannual Report to Congress: April 1, 2021, through September 30, 2021

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<div>This report was submitted to the Comptroller General in accordance with Section 5 of the Government Accountability Office Act of 2008. The report summarizes the activities of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the six-month reporting period ending September 30, 2021. During the reporting period, the OIG issued one audit report and continued two performance audits. In addition, the OIG closed 15 investigations and two self-initiated inquiries, and opened 10 new investigations. The OIG processed 59 hotline complaints, many of which were referred to other OIGs for action because the matters involved were within their jurisdictions. The OIG remained active in the GAO and OIG communities by briefing new GAO employees on its audit and investigative missions, and participating in committees and working groups of the Council of Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency, including those related to the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee. Details of these activities and other accomplishments are provided in the report.</div>

This report was submitted to the Comptroller General in accordance with Section 5 of the Government Accountability Office Act of 2008. The report summarizes the activities of the Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the six-month reporting period ending September 30, 2021. During the reporting period, the OIG issued one audit report and continued two performance audits. In addition, the OIG closed 15 investigations and two self-initiated inquiries, and opened 10 new investigations.

The OIG processed 59 hotline complaints, many of which were referred to other OIGs for action because the matters involved were within their jurisdictions. The OIG remained active in the GAO and OIG communities by briefing new GAO employees on its audit and investigative missions, and participating in committees and working groups of the Council of Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency, including those related to the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee. Details of these activities and other accomplishments are provided in the report.

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