December 3, 2021

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North Carolina Tax Preparer Sentenced to Prison for Defrauding IRS

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<div>A North Carolina tax return preparer was sentenced today to 20 months in prison for conspiring to defraud the IRS.</div>
A North Carolina tax return preparer was sentenced today to 20 months in prison for conspiring to defraud the IRS.

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