December 3, 2021

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North Carolina Tax Preparer Sentenced for False Returns

24 min read
<div>A North Carolina man was sentenced yesterday to 33 months in prison for assisting in the preparation of a false tax return and for filing a false personal income tax return.</div>
A North Carolina man was sentenced yesterday to 33 months in prison for assisting in the preparation of a false tax return and for filing a false personal income tax return.

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