January 22, 2022

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North Carolina Risk Consultant Pleads Guilty to Tax Fraud and Illegally Possessing a Firearm

21 min read
<div>A Chapel Hill, N.C., businessman pleaded guilty today to filing a false tax return and being a felon in possession of a firearm, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Matthew G.T. Martin for the Middle District of North Carolina.</div>

A Chapel Hill, N.C., businessman pleaded guilty today to filing a false tax return and being a felon in possession of a firearm, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Matthew G.T. Martin for the Middle District of North Carolina.

According to court filed documents, Charles Agee Atkins controlled and operated several risk consulting businesses, including Financial Engineering & Risk Management LLC, Risk Assessment & Management LLC, and Ram Omni LLC.  From 2011 through 2017, Atkins underreported the income that he received from these businesses on his tax returns, causing a tax loss of more than $380,000 to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  Atkins also admitted that he failed to pay more than $420,000 in taxes he owed to the IRS for several previous years.  All told, Atkins caused a tax loss of more than $800,000 to the IRS.

Atkins also pleaded guilty to being a felon in possession of a firearm.  According to court documents, Atkins was convicted of tax fraud in 1988, and during a 2019 search warrant executed on Atkins’s Chapel Hill residence, federal agents found a 12 gauge shotgun, which Atkins could not legally possess because of his prior convictions.

U.S. District Judge Catherine Eagles will set sentencing at a later date.  At sentencing, Atkins faces a maximum sentence of three years in prison on the tax charge and ten years in prison on the felon in possession charge.  He also faces a period of supervised release, restitution, and monetary penalties.

Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Zuckerman and U.S. Attorney Martin thanked special agents of IRS-Criminal Investigation, who conducted the investigation, and Assistant Chief Todd Ellinwood of the Tax Division and Assistant U.S. Attorney Tanner Kroeger, who are prosecuting the case.

Additional information about the Tax Division and its enforcement efforts may be found on the division’s website.

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