December 3, 2021

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North Carolina Man Sentenced to 75 Months in Prison for a Dog Fighting Offense and Possession of a Firearm by a Prohibited Person

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<div>A North Carolina man was sentenced today to 75 months in prison for conspiracy to commit dog fighting offenses and being a felon in possession of a firearm.</div>
A North Carolina man was sentenced today to 75 months in prison for conspiracy to commit dog fighting offenses and being a felon in possession of a firearm.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In Crime News
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