January 27, 2022

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New Zealand Travel Advisory

14 min read

Exercise increased caution in New Zealand due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.   

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 1 Travel Health Notice for New Zealand due to COVID-19.  

New Zealand  continues to enforce border restrictions due to COVID-19.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in New Zealand.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to New Zealand:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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