January 25, 2022

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Nevada Vacuum Distributor and Salesman Both Convicted by Jury in Conspiracy to Defraud the IRS

9 min read
<div>A federal jury convicted two Nevada men, Saud Alessa and Jeffrey Bowen, yesterday for conspiring to defraud the IRS. A third co-conspirator, Jackie Hayes, previously pleaded guilty to the same charge on Oct. 15. The jury also convicted Alessa today of tax evasion and filing false tax returns.</div>
A federal jury convicted two Nevada men, Saud Alessa and Jeffrey Bowen, yesterday for conspiring to defraud the IRS. A third co-conspirator, Jackie Hayes, previously pleaded guilty to the same charge on Oct. 15. The jury also convicted Alessa today of tax evasion and filing false tax returns.

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