January 27, 2022

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Mongolia Travel Advisory

6 min read

Reconsider travel to Mongolia due to COVID-19.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 2 Travel Health Notice for Mongolia due to COVID-19.

Mongolia has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some in-country transportation options and business operations. However, Mongolia maintains an almost total ban on the entry of foreigners and has limited incoming air traffic to government-controlled charter flights. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Mongolia.

Read the country information page.  

If you travel to Mongolia, you should:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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