December 5, 2021

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Monaco National Day

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Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Monaco as you celebrate your 165th National Day.

Monaco has been a trusted partner and a friend to the United States since 1866.  H.S.H. Prince Albert II is a leading voice in the global effort on ocean conservation and sustainability, and Monaco’s commitment to conserving biodiversity and transitioning toward a carbon-free economy has established it as a leader in meeting the challenges of the climate crisis. 

We look forward to continuing our work with the Monegasque people and the Government of Monaco on promoting greater freedom, transparency, and human rights.

Best wishes for an enjoyable Sovereign Prince’s Day.

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