December 3, 2021

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Mississippi Podiatrist Charged for Alleged Foot Bath Scheme

13 min read
<div>A federal grand jury in Oxford, Mississippi, returned an indictment on Oct. 27 that was unsealed today, charging a Mississippi podiatrist with a scheme to defraud health care benefit programs, including Medicare, by prescribing and dispensing medically unnecessary medications and ordering medically unnecessary testing, including in exchange for kickbacks and bribes.</div>
A federal grand jury in Oxford, Mississippi, returned an indictment on Oct. 27 that was unsealed today, charging a Mississippi podiatrist with a scheme to defraud health care benefit programs, including Medicare, by prescribing and dispensing medically unnecessary medications and ordering medically unnecessary testing, including in exchange for kickbacks and bribes.

More from: November 2, 2021

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