January 24, 2022

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Micronesia Travel Advisory

12 min read

Exercise increased caution in  Micronesia due to COVID-19 and Embassy Kolonia’s limited capacity to provide support to U.S. citizens.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.  

Micronesia continues to have transportation options, with limited flights into the country (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools).  However, no passengers are able to disembark in the country.  Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Micronesia.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the FSM:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

 

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