January 29, 2022

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Massachusetts Man Charged with Child Pornography Possession

8 min read
<div>A Sutton, Massachusetts, man was arrested and charged today with possession of child pornography.</div>

A Sutton, Massachusetts, man was arrested and charged today with possession of child pornography.

Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian C. Rabbitt of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Andrew E. Lelling for the District of Massachusetts, Acting Special Agent in Charge David Magdycz of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations in Boston, and Sutton Police Chief Dennis J. Towle made the announcement.

Oliver Smith, 45, a citizen of Sweden and the United States, was charged by criminal complaint with possession of child pornography.  Following an initial appearance this afternoon before Magistrate Judge David H. Hennessy, Smith was detained pending a detention hearing scheduled for Dec. 3, 2020.

According to the criminal complaint, on Nov. 15, 2020, after receiving investigative information from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and Swedish law enforcement authorities, and conducting its own investigation, federal agents executed a search warrant at Smith’s Sutton residence and seized several devices.  A preliminary forensic review of the seized devices revealed images and videos of child pornography.  During an interview with federal agents, Smith admitted that he had downloaded child pornography upon his return to the United States from Sweden.

Jessica Urban of the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS) and Assistant U.S. Attorney Kristen Noto of the District of Massachusetts’ Worcester Branch Office are prosecuting the case. The case is being investigated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s Homeland Security Investigations in Boston, and the Sutton Police Department.

The case is brought as part of Project Safe Childhood.  In 2006, the Department of Justice created Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative designed to protect children from exploitation and abuse.  Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and CEOS, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to locate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals who exploit children, as well as identify and rescue victims.  For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov/.

The details contained in the complaint are allegations. The defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law. 

The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the Department of Justice.  Learn more about the history of our agency at www.Justice.gov/Celebrating150Years.

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