January 27, 2022

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Man Sentenced to 97 months in Prison for Role in International Credit Card Fraud and Money Laundering Conspiracy

13 min read

U.S. Attorney’s Office District of Nevada

Las Vegas, Nevada

A man who pleaded guilty to his involvement in a multimillion dollar international counterfeit credit card fraud and money laundering conspiracy was sentenced today to 97 months in federal prison to be followed by three years of supervised release, announced United States Attorney Nicholas A. Trutanich for the District of Nevada.

Bruno Macedo Correia, 29, pleaded guilty in July 2019, to conspiracy to commit fraud and related activity in connection with access devices and conspiracy to commit money laundering. In addition to imprisonment, United States District Judge Jennifer A. Dorsey ordered Correia to pay restitution in the amount of $2,288,180.97. The Court also imposed a $5,000,000 criminal forfeiture money judgment, and ordered 196 items of property and U.S. currency forfeited.

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