December 4, 2021

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Man Sentenced to More Than 16 Years’ Imprisonment for Attempting to Provide Material Support to Terrorists

16 min read
<div>A New York man was sentenced today to 200 months, more than 16 years, in prison for attempting to provide material support and resources to the designated foreign terrorist organizations the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) and the al-Nusrah Front.</div>
A New York man was sentenced today to 200 months, more than 16 years, in prison for attempting to provide material support and resources to the designated foreign terrorist organizations the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) and the al-Nusrah Front.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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