January 20, 2022

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Louisville Gas & Electric Company to Permanently Limit Harmful Air Pollution

10 min read
<div>In a proposed consent decree lodged today in U.S. District Court, Louisville Gas & Electric Company (LG&E) has agreed to permanent emission limits for the sulfuric acid mist that it emits from its Mill Creek Station, located in Jefferson County, Kentucky.</div>
In a proposed consent decree lodged today in U.S. District Court, Louisville Gas & Electric Company (LG&E) has agreed to permanent emission limits for the sulfuric acid mist that it emits from its Mill Creek Station, located in Jefferson County, Kentucky.

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    In U.S GAO News
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    In U.S GAO News
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