January 25, 2022

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Loan Servicer Agrees to Pay Nearly $8 Million to Resolve Alleged False Claims in Connection with Federal Education Loans

23 min read
<div>Conduent Education Services LLC, fka Xerox Education Services LLC, dba ACS Education Services LLC (CES), a contractor that serviced student loans for lenders under the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFEL), has agreed to pay $7.9 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting or causing the submission of false claims to the Department of Education. Prior to this settlement, CES paid $1.4 million to the Department of Education under a remediation plan to partially resolve the allegations and received a credit for that payment under the settlement agreement.</div>
Conduent Education Services LLC, fka Xerox Education Services LLC, dba ACS Education Services LLC (CES), a contractor that serviced student loans for lenders under the Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFEL), has agreed to pay $7.9 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting or causing the submission of false claims to the Department of Education. Prior to this settlement, CES paid $1.4 million to the Department of Education under a remediation plan to partially resolve the allegations and received a credit for that payment under the settlement agreement.

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